// More fuel from biomass using hydrogen

Even in a post‐fossil age, carbon‐based fuels (C fuels) will still be required in a number of sectors (e.g. aviation, long‐distance haulage and shipping). The only renewable energy source that contains carbon is biomass. However, it is not possible to convert 100% of the carbon into a C fuel using conventional methods because the hydrogen content in the biomass is limited. Therefore, an “extension of the energy range” of the limited biomass resources is necessary for the highly efficient production of C fuels. In this regard, promising approaches include the production of biogas and the thermochemical conversion of biomass (e.g. gasification) in combination with electrolysed hydrogen that is produced using renewable electricity. Biomass is used as a carbon source and is converted to carbon based energy carriers, such as methane (CH4), higher hydrocarbons (CxHy) and alcohols or ethers (CxHyOz), during the biogas process or during gasification using biomass to gas (BtG) processes in combination with Power-to-Gas (P2G®)/gas to liquids (GTL) processes. In the case of anaerobic biogas production, the yield of C fuels per cultivated area can be almost doubled while when using biomass gasification, it is possible to triple the energy yield. The additional yields, shown in bright yellow and purple in the chart, are due to H2 added in the biomass conversion paths. As a result, there is a drastic reduction in the agricultural area required for biomass-based cultivation.

Contact

Dr. Jochen Brellochs
+49 (0)711 78 70-211